WHAT SHOULD I NOT PLANT BEFORE GARLIC

WHAT SHOULD I NOT PLANT BEFORE GARLIC

What should i not plant before garlic? is the next question that we want to answer to help you make a good decision when you want to grow and plant garlic well.

Garlic gets along with most plants but specifically no plant has been notified for not to be planted before garlic, however asparagus, peas, beans, sage, parsley, and strawberries should not be cultivated near it because it can inhibit their growth.

THE KING OF COMPANION PLANTING IS GARLIC

We welcome you to garliccare, here we try to answers all you question about garlic and how to grow garlic, plant garlic, and garlic recipes. But this how to grow garlic guide we will talk about “ what should i not plant before garlic”

Read Also: WHAT SHOULD I PLANT BEFORE GARLIC?

One of the most popular companion plants is garlic. It’s a natural pest and fungal preventive that may be cultivated alongside most plants. It takes up little room, isn’t picky about soil, and can thrive in a variety of environments.

Its strong flavor, I’m sure, is what persuades people that it keeps pests and diseases at bay. If it can keep vampires away, a few glitches shouldn’t be an issue.

WHAT DOES GARLIC (ALLIUM SATIVUM) HAVE TO OFFER?

Fungus gnats, codling moths, spider mites, cabbage loppers, Japanese beetles, and even ants are all deterred by garlic. Garlic gets its pungent flavor from an accumulation of sulfur compounds, which are natural fungicides. That explains its disease-fighting abilities.

IS GARLIC COMPANION PLANTING A MYTH OR A FACT?

Is Garlic a Pest Deterrent?

Garlic, chives, coriander, fennel, oregano, or sweet marjoram were planted in strawberry fields in a Brazilian study. The number of two-spotted spider mites was then counted.

The tests were carried out in both the field and the greenhouse. When bigger numbers of two-spotted spider mites were present in the field, garlic caused a significant reduction (up to 52 percent) in strawberry plants. Reduced amounts of fennel and chives were also seen.

It’s crucial to note that the insect was not completely eradicated, and that the method worked best when the pest population was large.

In Zimbabwe, a fascinating study contrasted garlic-planted cabbage versus cabbage sprayed with malathion 25WP. The diamondback moth was being hunted for.

Although there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups, counts were greater in the control group that did not get any spray or garlic.

A research in China looked at the green peach aphid on tobacco and discovered that planting garlic reduced the amount of aphids, “particularly when populations peaked.

” Garlic intercropping had no negative impact on other arthropod populations. The diversity, richness, and stability of arthropod communities increased.” This appears to be suspicious. Why was only one type of arthropod harmed?

In this Botswana study, kale was intercropped with garlic, basil, or marigolds. Basil had the fewest cabbage pests, although garlic and marigold also helped to lower the aphid population.

Flea beetles lay the same number of eggs on cauliflowers with or without mint, garlic, dill, or sage, according to a UK study.

Garlic pests: A Quick Guide

These are only a few of the research projects that have been completed. Garlic appears to be effective in reducing pests.

Garlic is said to produce volatile oils that confuse flying insects, making it more difficult for them to locate their host plant.

There is little consistency between the purported list of bugs and the ones tested in these reports. I believe the companion planting lists found in most gardening publications have been made up and repeated so many times that people now believe them.

To draw any conclusions regarding a specific insect, it must be examined on the target host plant as well as garlic.

What happens to pollinators and predator insects, which are both beneficial insects?

Garlic repels nuisance insects while simultaneously repelling helpful insects. What kind of impact does this have on the crops?

When this item was shared on Facebook, a remark was left saying, “My Garlic Farm used to experience Aphid infestations.”

Is Garlic Good for Yield?

It may deter pests, but does it boost yield? As previously said, this is the most critical question to ask of any companion planting proposal.

A research in China indicated a little (2-6 percent) output gain when eggplant was intercropped with garlic (kilogram per hectare). It’s unclear whether or not this was statistically significant.

Garlic grown with sugar cane decreased the sugar cane crop in India, but the total value of both crops increased.

Other Related Guide:

Strawberry crop yields were shown to be lowered when coupled with garlic, peppers, or snap beans in Egypt, according to research. Strawberries are one crop that should be avoided while using garlic.

There isn’t a lot of evidence that garlic boosts yields. It’s reasonable to anticipate that if insect damage is reduced, yields will increase, but scientific evidence to back this up is scarce.

Is it possible to plant garlic with beans?

Garlic is supposed to impede the growth of beans, therefore these two plants shouldn’t be cultivated together, although research contradicts this. This study did not directly check for this effect, but it did find that the two crops were exchanging nitrogen with no evidence that beans were damaged.

Garlic Has the Potential to Affect the Target Crop

When garlic is cultivated alongside another crop, how does it affect that crop?

This study looked at nutritional changes in cucumber plants grown in pots with and without garlic.

Cucumber plants have higher amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and manganese (Mn), but lower levels of magnesium (Mg). The difference was proportional to the number of garlic bulbs planted, with medium planting providing the greatest effect.

When Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) was cultivated with or without garlic, researchers discovered that the cabbage with garlic had increased amounts of soluble protein and nitrate, but not sugar content.

Garlic Alters the Soil

A Chinese study looked at how the soil changed when peppers were planted alone or with garlic under plastic tunnels.

“The bacteria population increased greatly in the pepper plot intercropped with conventional bulb garlic, while actinomycetes increased significantly in the pepper plot intercropped with green garlic,” according to the findings.

In pepper-green garlic intercropped plots, fungus populations were dramatically reduced.”

The idea that garlic impacts soil bacteria is intriguing, but it doesn’t tell us anything about the crops on their own. Depending on which bacteria are affected, such alterations may improve or decrease the production of pepper crops.

What we can conclude is that garlic has an impact on the soil microbial population.

In addition to enzymes, pH, and EC changes in the soil, this study found that “intercropping peppers with green garlic improved soil microbiological and biochemical characteristics as compared to monocropping.”

The fact that standard bulb garlic and green garlic (different cultivars of Allium sativum) yielded different results is also intriguing.

The same results were found in a study that looked at both bulb garlic and green garlic cultivars cultivated with peppers.

They also discovered that intercropping boosted NPK in the soil, and that “the intercropping of peppers with garlic promotes soil fertility by modifying nutrient levels, enzymatic activity, and the soil microbial population,” as they put it.

These two studies illustrate that any influence on a crop differs depending on the cultivar utilized. Garlic does not create the same results in everyone. When it comes to companion planting, varieties are rarely mentioned in books or blogs.

The concept that garlic’s sulfur components act as a natural fungicide appears to be true, at least in the soil. That does not imply that sickness is reduced above ground.

Does Garlic Intercropping Work?

The tale is significantly more complicated than popular companion planting literature suggests, and we can’t answer this issue unless we know what crops are being addressed.

Although there is little to no research on most crops, there is evidence that growing garlic increases production.

Garlic appears to lessen the prevalence of several pests, according to some studies. However, none of the pest population studies also looked at yields. Is it true that reducing a pest results in increased yields? It’s unclear based on the information I gathered.

Intercropping garlic with other crops appears to alter a number of soil factors, including nitrogen levels and living populations.

What isn’t clear is how this will affect plants. What effect does the rise in bacteria and decline in fungi have on crops?

The advantages of companion planting might be either one-way or two-way. I found no evidence that the garlic crop is beneficial in any of the publications I read.

This could be because the researchers were looking for ways to boost the value of more valuable crops and garlic was not a priority, or garlic did not benefit.

Three Sisters Agriculture — Companion Planting in Action

Is Intercropping Garlic a Good Idea?

The majority of existing research is conducted outside of North America and Europe. It’s probable that countries with less access to pesticides, less mechanization, and lower manual labor expenses are more interested.

Keep in mind that, at least in zone 5, garlic is planted in the fall and harvested in the mid-summer, whereas peppers are planted in the spring and harvested in the late summer or fall. This makes an automated process more difficult.

For the home gardener who does everything by hand, this is far less of a concern.

Companion planting also has a practical application. The spacing of most crops is important. When you intercrop, how does it impact things? In circles that promote companion planting, there is minimal discussion about this.

Intercropping with garlic has undoubtedly some utility from the perspective of a home owner. However, there is a scarcity of concrete knowledge on which crops benefit.

The lists seen in popular texts on the subject aren’t scientifically sound. The majority of the suggestions appear to be based on a non-scientific book called Carrots Love Tomatoes by Louise Riotte.

There is no more information, such as crop spacing or the optimum cultivars.

Garlic may be good to house owners if they have a pest problem, but unless they are trying to fix a real problem, garlic may or may not be beneficial, and it may even diminish yield on some crops, in my opinion.

Opinions from homeowners on social media are usually meaningless without thorough control testing.

CONCLUSION

Garlic is a natural pest and fungal preventive that may be cultivated alongside most plants. Garlic gets its pungent flavor from an accumulation of sulfur compounds, which are natural fungicides. Asparagus, peas, beans, sage, parsley, and strawberries should not be cultivated near it.

Garlic is said to produce volatile oils that confuse flying insects, making it more difficult for them to locate their host plant. Garlic repels nuisance insects while simultaneously repelling helpful insects.

It may deter pests, but does it boost yields? This is the most critical question to ask of any companion planting proposal. Cucumber plants grown in pots with or without garlic have increased amounts of soluble protein and nitrate, but not sugar content.

A Chinese study looked at how the soil changed when peppers were planted alone or with garlic under plastic tunnels. The study found that intercropping peppers with garlic improved soil microbiological and biochemical characteristics.

Garlic appears to lessen the prevalence of several pests, according to some studies. Intercropping garlic with other crops appears to alter a number of soil factors, including nitrogen levels and living populations.

The advantages of companion planting might be either one-way or two-way. Garlic is planted in the fall and harvested in the summer, while peppers are planted in spring and harvested later in the year. The spacing of most crops is important, and garlic intercropping can affect crop spacing, so be sure to check with your local nursery before starting a garden.

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