what does garlic, ginger and turmeric do to the body

WHAT DOES GARLIC, GINGER AND TURMERIC DO TO THE BODY

what does garlic, ginger and turmeric do to the body is our recent question that we want to answer to help you make good decision about eating and using of the above mention ingredients.

We welcome you to garliccare, here we try to answers all you question about garlic and how to grow garlic, plant garlic, and garlic recipes. But this article or guide we will talk about “what does garlic, ginger and turmeric do to the body”

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On their own, these two tubers are healthy-food superstars, but when they team up, they’re a gastronomic powerhouse. We’ve compiled a list of the health advantages of turmeric and ginger, as well as a few delectable dishes to help you enjoy them.

WHAT DOES GARLIC, GINGER AND TURMERIC DO TO THE BODY

Garlic, turmeric, and ginger are three wellness buzzwords that have practically everyone’s attention. These have long been the foundations of All India Cafe’s Indian food, and they’re here to stay.

 They each bring their own unique, rich flavors to every dish they encounter, but their long-standing appeal stems from the therapeutic benefits they offer to those who consume them.

Ginger is a tropical Asian medicinal herb. It has numerous health benefits, including the potential to prevent cancer.

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Turmeric is a widely used spice in India. It’s being researched for its cancer-fighting potential. Garlic is a hardy perennial onion family herb. Many cultures have utilized it as a therapeutic substance for thousands of years.

Ginger, turmeric, and garlic are available as juices and supplements on the market. Consult your doctor before attempting to use any of these therapeutic plants.

Without turmeric, our cuisine would not be what it is. This superfood component is a shining star when it comes to the health benefits it provides.

This powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant has long been hailed as an effective, all-natural strategy to strengthen the immune system and combat infections and disorders.

 Curcumin, the main ingredient in turmeric, has antiviral characteristics and can help lower the severity of influenza A virus, according to animal and test-tube research published on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TURMERIC AND GINGER?

Turmeric and ginger aren’t new foods; they’ve been around for a long time. Ginger’s origins can be traced back to ancient China, when it was utilized as a spice and a medicine.

It’s been used as a herbal medicine for motion sickness, nausea, discomfort, and digestive problems for a long time. It then expanded throughout Asia and Europe, becoming a home staple for many.

Turmeric has long been farmed in Southeast Asia, with India remaining the leading producer.

Both meals are derived from the rhizome, a plant stem that develops underground and generates shoots from its sides, akin to a root system. When both plants are ready to be picked, they produce gorgeous flowers above ground.

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Garlic is known to be helpful against bacteria, and many people believe it can help them avoid being sick, spend less time sick, and recover faster.

You may be guaranteed that your food contains either garlic, ginger, turmeric, or a combination of all three, no matter what you order!

WHAT DOES GARLIC, GINGER AND TURMERIC DO TO THE BODY

Pain-Relieving

Turmeric and ginger, according to traditional Chinese medicine, provide pain-relieving properties for a range of diseases.

Curcumin, turmeric’s anti-inflammatory superstar, has been shown to help lessen the symptoms of severe inflammatory disorders such as arthritis and colitis. Ginger can aid women with poor period symptoms, according to a study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

In their study, students who took a 500-mg ginger root powder capsule 3 times a day for five days had significantly less menstrual pain than those who did not.

According to the Journal of Discomfort, these benefits can even translate to enhanced athletic performance and relief from post-exercise pain.

Consuming just 2 grams of ginger, heated or raw, every day for 11 days reduced discomfort and perceived effort in research participants.

Antioxidant-Rich

Both ginger and turmeric are high in anti-inflammatory chemicals. Ginger’s antioxidants may help against heart disease and cancer, particularly when combined with garlic. Turmeric has even greater antioxidant properties.

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According to a 2017 study, turmeric has nearly seven times the amount of antioxidants as ginger. There are various methods for determining antioxidant capacity, each with slightly varied outcomes.

Turmeric and ginger, on the other hand, are two of the most antioxidant-rich spices available. Pair them with some of the Best Antioxidant-Rich Foods to take it a step further.

Anti-Inflammatory

Both ginger and turmeric have powerful anti-inflammatory properties on their own. The strong flavor and defensive benefits of ginger are due to a molecule called gingerol.

Gingerol has been shown to reduce inflammation in a variety of illnesses, including the common cold and inflammatory bowel disease. Turmeric is a member of the same plant family as ginger.

When it comes to anti-inflammation, curcumin is once again at the forefront. Curcumin-based medications for disease therapy have piqued interest due to their efficacy.

Ginger and turmeric, like many other classic culinary pairings, work best together. The effects of a ginger-turmeric combo on rheumatoid arthritis symptoms were investigated in a study published in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

 Despite the fact that the research was conducted on rats, the anti-inflammatory tonic outperformed the medicine indomethacin, which is often used to treat arthritis symptoms.

Finally, they discovered that combining ginger and turmeric reduced arthritis severity and consequences.

 Our endocrine system, whose hormones regulate many biological activities, is likewise affected by these anti-inflammatory advantages.

According to one study, ginger and turmeric may alter how fat is distributed throughout our bodies due to their hormonal effects.

Heart-Healthy Benefit

These tuberous roots can assist maintain your heart healthy in addition to safeguarding your brain and muscles. When plaque and platelets become lodged in your blood arteries, high blood pressure might develop.

This puts more strain on your heart as it pumps blood, raising your blood pressure. Ginger has been discovered to enhance blood circulation, which aids in the prevention of plaque and blood clots.

 Turmeric also possesses anti-hypertensive properties, which are mostly due to its anti-inflammatory properties.

Turmeric has also been shown in studies to lower cholesterol absorption in the gut, which may protect against other heart disorders such as coronary heart disease. To demonstrate a link between turmeric and cholesterol, more research is needed.

Cancer-Blocking

A study published in the journal JCO Global Oncology looked at which spices could help prevent cancer. Ginger and turmeric jumped to the top of the list right away. They both prevent the development of nitroamines and nitroamides, which are known carcinogens.

These are the same chemicals that made people skeptical of nitrites in cured meats in the first place.

The root assisted cigarette smokers in excreting harmful carcinogenic substances while simultaneously boosting preventive components such as antioxidants in the body.

Fresh herbs and spices are a terrific defensive addition to your dish, especially in light of all of the studies on environmental toxins.

Stomach-Soothing

Ginger is a well-known home treatment for nausea, but how scientifically sound is it? Several research have looked into why ginger helps to calm an upset stomach, and the general agreement is that it does.

Gingerol, an antioxidant molecule found in ginger, interacts with serotonin (also known as the “feel good” chemical) receptors in the brain to reduce pain.

For pregnant women and chemotherapy patients, this could have therapeutic implications. In a 2016 study, both of these populations were examined, and the results were promising.

Immune-Boosting

Ginger is frequently advised for a common cold, and scientific evidence supports this claim. According to a study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ginger inhibits viral attachment via altering airway mucus production.

When flu season arrives, it’s also a good idea to stock up on turmeric. The same molecules that give turmeric its anti-inflammatory properties may also protect you from influenza and pneumonia, according to a study published in International Immunopharmacology.

The next time you’re feeling under the weather, try making some ginger-turmeric tea.

GARLIC BENEFITS

Garlic’s preventive impact against the development of various human cancers has been supported by numerous epidemiological research.

Garlic’s organo-sulfur compounds, particularly allicin, are potent antioxidants that can protect DNA from damage caused by reactive oxygen species, or free radicals.

 According to the University of California, San Diego, numerous studies have found that oxidative DNA damage is an independent risk factor for cancer.

GARLIC, TURMERIC AND GINGER: HOW TO USE THEM

Turmeric and ginger are both sold as entire roots or powders at most supermarket stores.

Whole roots should be stored in a dry, dark place, such as a brown paper bag, because the powder has a longer shelf life than the whole roots.

 It’s easy to see why their flavors are so prevalent in Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine by looking at their roots. In fact, turmeric and ginger are two of the most common constituents in curry powder.

Turmeric and ginger are common ingredients in stir-fries, curries, stews, drinks, and other dishes.

Both provide a tangy, delicious note to smoothies and juices. Just make sure they’re both peeled before using. Turmeric has a brighter color than ginger but a milder flavor.

 As a result, turmeric should be used in higher quantities, whereas pungent, spicy ginger should be used with caution. Curcumin, turmeric’s super-healthy ingredient, is tough for human systems to absorb on its own.

Fortunately, when combined with black pepper, it is absorbed 2,000 times better, so add a dash of pepper to your curries or golden milk.

CONCLUSION

Turmeric and ginger have a plethora of health benefits. They’re tasty on their own, but they also form a great culinary match and may have some health benefits in tandem.

 There are numerous benefits to incorporating turmeric and ginger into your diet, ranging from increased immunity to pain relief.

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